The Probus Club Weston-Super-Mare

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Programme Reports

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Aviation Comes to Bristol - Arthur Spencer

Posted on February 7, 2019 at 1:00 PM

We welcomed back yet again, Arthur, who has given such enthraling talks to us in the past.

Today, Arthur told the story, as per the title, of how the aviation industry developed in the Bristol region.

A lot of research had gone into this talk and we were thankful on being enlightened on the subject.

Thank you Arthur, no doubt we will see you again........................ 

Three Short Talks - Members

Posted on January 24, 2019 at 8:35 AM

Our first meeting of 2019 kicked off with, as the title suggests, 'Three Short Talks'.

The idea for such a meeting was hatched by one of our long serving members , initially as an insurance topic in case the weather was so bad, that the arranged speaker could not make the venue.

As it turned out, it was quite a glorious morning today although a bit on the 'chilly' side. 

Now that our insurance has been used, we hope that the weather does not turn for the worst for futur...

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The Day the Guns Stopped - Garry Gowans

Posted on November 15, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Our last meeting of 2018 was fittingly, a talk revolving around Armistice Day.

However, a different slant on this historic day was presented by Garry who illustrated the topic with a slide show.

Garry explained that the mortal statistics around this historic day were indeed higher than the average day throught the war.

Men were needlessly lost due to the arrogance of their Command, just to make the Generals 'look good' in gaining an extra piece of land.

He also ex...

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The Day the Guns Stopped - Garry Gowans

Posted on November 15, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Our last meeting of 2018 was fittingly, a talk revolving around Armistice Day.

However, a different slant on this historic day was presented by Garry who illustrated the topic with a slide show.

Garry explained that the mortal statistics around this historic day were indeed higher than the average day throught the war.

Men were needlessly lost due to the arrogance of their Command, just to make the Generals 'look good' in gaining an extra piece of land.

He also ex...

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Birnbeck Pier, History & Future - Peter Lander

Posted on November 1, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Today, we welcomed 'the ladies' to join us.

Peter Lander, gave a talk about “The History of Birnbeck Pier and work of the Birnbeck Regeneration Trust”

A former welder, Peter moved from his home in Derbyshire to Weston-super Mare after taking early retirement, and is now the Trust’s archivist. As well as looking at the recorded history Peter will be talking about his work recording people’s memories of the Pier, researching their stories and gathering memora...

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Life & Times in a Polaris Submarine - Mike Bravery

Posted on October 18, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Todays talk centred around a tour of duty in the 1980's for a WEO (Weapons Engineering Officer), aboard a Polaris Submarine.

With the aid of a projector and sound system, Mike was able to 'transport' us back in time to relive what life aboard would have been like.

Political references omitted, Mike not only explained the workings 'on board' of the submarine but also the living arrangements.

Life on board could be dull at times, but there was plenty of provided entertainment ...

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From Gutenberg to Gates - Roy Ackrill

Posted on October 4, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Our talk today, given by Roy Ackrill, chartered the history of printing.

The key figure in the history of printing was Johann Gutenberg (1400? - 1468) of Mainz, Germany. Around 1430 he invented movable, interchangeable, re-usable type, for printing on a wooden press using a printing ink of a composition invented by him. It was an oily, varnish-like ink made of soot, turpentine, and walnut oil.

The print shop probably had around 25 staff and aimed to print around six pages of ...

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Britains Bloodiest Day, Towton 1461 - David Skillen

Posted on September 13, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Today's speaker, David Skillen was examining the battle of Towton on Palm Sunday, 29 March 1461, considered Britain’s bloodiest battle.

David set the scene of the Wars of the Roses, which rightly should be called the ‘Cousins War’, and would have been recognised as such at the time. It really was a series of battles between families that got bloodier and nastier as time went on, with rarely any quarter given – which went right against the idea of chivalry.

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Royal Shenanigans, Kings & Mistresses - Mike Rendell

Posted on July 5, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Today we welcomed Mike Rendell who gave a fortyfive minute powerpoint presentation looking at Royal shenanigans and naughty goings-on in the Georgian period.

It was not intended to offend – but it was certainly an eye-opener!

Arising out of his researches for “In bed with the Georgians – Sex, Scandal & Satire” , Mike put together this talk on “Royal Shenanigans”.

It looked at the earlier Georges and their propensity for taking mistre...

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Flying Boats to Singapore - Arthur Spencer

Posted on May 31, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Today, we welcomed the return of Arthur Spencer who treated us to an illustrated talk on the history of flying boats.

The heyday of flying boats in commercial aviation was the fifteen years between 1935 and 1950, and Arthur was a navigator on such services after the end of the War.

In 1924, the British Goverment merged four small existing airlines to create what became Imperial Airways. Until then, flying boats had been used for routes to various European and Mediterranean destina...

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